Blog

Amazon Gives Brands Power to Delete Counterfeit Listings

Amazon.com has launched Project Zero, a program that enables brands to designate counterfeit product listings on the e-tailer’s site for removal. Amazon is providing each product with a unique code that can be scanned to determine whether a product is authentic or counterfeit. The online retail giant launched a new anticounterfeiting program, called Project Zero, that it says would better protect brands from scammers by letting them designate listings for removal, rather than going through a cumbersome reporting process with Amazon.

The company has been testing it with roughly 15 brands for a few months, and will now start inviting selected additional companies to participate. Amazon said it wants all brand owners to join the program eventually but declined to specify a timeline.

As part of Project Zero, Amazon also is including a tool that generates a unique code for each product unit that the brand can print onto existing packaging or attach onto items using a sticker. The codes can then be scanned to ensure a product’s authenticity when it enters an Amazon warehouse.

In shifting some monitoring duties and authority to brands themselves, Amazon is taking an unusual step. Other tech companies use outside contractors to help monitor their platforms but don’t generally let users remove content. Amazon, for example, has required brand owners to report suspected counterfeits to an internal team that would investigate and decide whether or not to remove them.

Read the full article.

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Recent Blog Posts

How Much is Free Shipping REALLY Costing You?

Gone are the days when you could actually make money on shipping. Merchants are all too willing to move to a free shipping model without being aware of the entire cost of shipping a package. If you’re offering free shipping, it’s probably costing you 30 percent MORE than you think. If you talk to many companies that offer free shipping and ask, “How can you afford this?” Their answer: “I work the cost of shipping into the product.”

Amazon’s One-Day Shipping: The Real Story for Retailers

If Amazon owns nearly half of the $513 billion U.S. ecommerce market, why the need to offer one-day free delivery? The key to this decision is Amazon’s singular obsession with customer centricity and an appreciation for indirect results that don’t even register on the radar of some competitors.

Google Moves into Amazon Marketplace’s Turf

Google is positioning itself as a direct Amazon Marketplace competitor with a revamped e-commerce offering. Shoppers will have a personalized homepage on the existing Google Shopping tab, where they can filter results based on features and brands, read reviews, and watch videos about products.